Thursday, November 7, 2013

A Few Polls From The Rasmussen Reports

54% Favor Law Prohibiting Workplace Discrimination Against LGBT People

The U.S. Senate is expected to pass the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA), a bill prohibiting workplace discrimination on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation, although a plurality of voters don't see such discrimination as a serious problem. Most voters nationwide support the law, but one-in-three think certain religious organizations should be exempt from it. 

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey shows that 54% of Likely U.S. Voters favor a law that outlaws discrimination in the workplace against transgender, gay, lesbian and bisexual people. Thirty percent (30%) oppose such a law, while 16% are undecided.  (To see survey question wording, click here.)

The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 5-6, 2012 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC . See methodology.

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Right Direction or Wrong Track
24% Say Country is Heading in Right Direction

The number of U.S. voters who feel the country is heading in the right direction remains above 20% for the second week in a row. 

Twenty-four percent (24%) of Likely U.S. Voters now say that the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey for the week ending November 3. This is virtually unchanged from last week but is still well below the high of 43% the week before Election Day one year ago. 
  
  Confidence in the country’s direction fell to 13% three weeks ago in the midst of the partial federal government shutdown. It was the lowest finding in five years. 

After President Obama assumed office in January 2009, the number of voters who felt the country was headed in the right direction rose 40% in early May of that year. In 2010 and 2011, confidence fell to the narrow range of 14% to 19%, levels similar to those measured in the final months of the George W. Bush administration. Optimism began easing up again in mid-December 2011. 

Sixty-nine percent (69%) of voters now think the country is headed down the wrong track, also in line with last week but well below the recent high of 80% three weeks ago. From January 2009 until October 2012, belief that the country was on the wrong track ranged from 55% to 80%, but it tracked in the low 50s from just before Election Day until early December. 

The national telephone survey of 3,500 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports on October 28-November 3, 2013. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Fieldwork for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

The Rasmussen Employment Index which measures worker confidence fell another point in October to its lowest point of the year. For the first time in nearly a year, workers aren't reporting that their companies are hiring more people than they're letting go. 

Ninety-one percent (91%) of Republicans and 73% of voters not affiliated with either major party still think the country is on the wrong track. Democrats are almost evenly divided. 

Fifty-nine percent (59%) of voters under 40 think the country’s on the wrong track, but older voters are even more pessimistic. 

Blacks remain much more positive about the country's direction than whites and other minority voters.

Ninety percent (90%) of conservative voters and 65% of moderates think the country is on the wrong track, but just 45% of liberals agree.  Read much more on this survey and the results at:

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Only 33% Think Most Judges Follow the Law in Their Rulings

Thursday, November 07, 2013

Judges are often criticized for legislating from the bench, and just one-in-three voters now believes most judicial rulings follow the law as written. 

A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 39% of Likely U.S. Voters think most judges in their rulings try to make new law they like better. Only 33% believe most judges in their rulings follow the letter of the law. Nearly as many (28%) are not sure which is the case. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on November 1-2, 2013 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology